Pennsylvania

  • Gordon Sandstone (Injection Wells)

    Formation: Gordon Sandstone
    (Injection Wells)
    Formation Depth: 2 wells at ~ 2450′
    Prior Injection: 0 BWPD @ 1200 psi
    After Stimulation: 150 – 200 BWPD @ 1200 psi
    Sustained: 150 – 200 BWPD @ 1200 psi

    Two injection wells in Washington County, Pennsylvania, were stimulated with the GasGun. The wells were completed open hole in the Gordon formation at an approximate depth of 2450 feet. Prior to the stimulation the operator could not inject any fluid at all at 1200 psi. After the GasGun, they were immediately able to inject an average of 150 – 200 BWPD at 1200 psi. Several months later the wells were still holding at their post stimulation injection rates.

  • Gordon Sandstone (Injection Well)

    Formation: Gordon Sandstone
    (Injection Well)
    Formation Depth: 2360′
    Prior Injection: 70 BWPD @ 1200 psi
    After Stimulation: 300 BWPD @ 1200 psi
    Sustained: 300 BWPD @ 1200 psi

    An injection well in Washington County, Pennsylvania was stimulated with a 6 foot GasGun. This well is a cased hole completion in the Gordon formation at a depth of 2360 feet. Prior to the stimulation the operator could inject 70 BWPD at 1200 psi. After the GasGun they were immediately able to inject 300 BWPD at the same pressure. After several months the injection rate was still holding at 300 BWPD.

  • Lockport Dolomite

    Formation: Lockport Dolomite
    Formation Depth: 5208′
    Prior Production: 65 MCF/D
    After Stimulation: 120 MCF/D
    Sustained: 120 MCF/D

    A well in Mercer County, Pennsylvania, was stimulated with a 10 foot GasGun. The well was completed open hole in the Lockport dolomite formation at a depth of 5208 feet. Prior to the stimulation the well was making 65 MCF/D. After the GasGun, the well showed no increase in production for nearly 3 months. The operator then noticed that the well pressure began to build, and the flow started to increase. Within about a week’s time the well settled in 120 MCF/D. The operator believes that too much fluid was put in the well during the workover, and that ultimately it took some time to get that fluid off the formation.